NOVEL CONVERSATIONS – Episode 5

Bry and I planned on seeing the new Little Women movie, that came out a few weeks back. To prepare ourselves, we watched the 1994 version of Little Women the weekend before. And then today, after finally seeing the 2019 version, I turned to a podcast, discussing this beloved book.

More on that later.

SO WHAT SATURDAY!

Motherhood. I have a few ideas – a few things to try on my little humans this week, after putting some thought into my posts over the past 4 or 5 days:

There are a million and one ways I could improve as a mother. I am okay with that. I feel like these are a few ways I can make big improvements.

But. Sometimes, when I am not in a good place, I feel so incredibly overwhelmed.

“The same thing that bothered me about (Little Women) as an adult, bothered me as a child. And that’s why I read the story over and over again. I was always trying to figure out why I am not as good as these girls, and why my mom wasn’t perfect like their mom, Marmee”

Well. Marmee is fictional. I cannot be Marmee. I am okay with that. And I am okay with my children. But there are some true principles taught in the book that I think we can learn from, even if the characters are fiction.

I want to close with some of my favorite quotes from Little Women, by Louisa May Alcott:

“Your father, Jo. He never loses patience, never doubts or complains, but always hopes, and works and waits so cheerfully that one is ashamed to do otherwise before him.”

“Love is a great beautifier.”

“Have regular hours for work and play; make each day both useful and pleasant, and prove that you understand the worth of time by employing it well. Then youth will bring few regrets, and life will become a beautiful success.”

“Watch and pray, dear, never get tired of trying, and never think it is impossible to conquer your fault.”

“Speaking of Father reminded me how much I miss him, how much I owe him, and how faithfully I should watch and work to keep his little daughters safe and good for him.”

“For with eyes made clear by many tears, and a heart softened by the tenderest sorrow, she recognized the beauty of her sister’s life—uneventful, unambitious, yet full of the genuine virtues which ‘smell sweet, and blossom in the dust’, the self-forgetfulness that makes the humblest on earth remembered soonest in heaven, the true success which is possible to all.”